• The Royal Society, Convocation of the Fellowship Part I

    published: 02 Jun 2016
  • Professor Jonathon Pines elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society

    Professor Jonathon Pines, head of the division of Cancer Biology at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, has been elected as a Fellow of the prestigious Royal Society. Here, he explains why his election is such an honour for a UK scientist, details his area of research and describes the opportunities at the ICR for furthering cancer research. Read the full story: http://www.icr.ac.uk/news-archive/eminent-cancer-researchers-elected-to-royal-society-fellowship

    published: 29 Apr 2016
  • UCD Professor Kenneth Wolfe elected Fellow of the Royal Society

    Professor of Genomic Evolution, UCD School of Medicine and UCD Conway Institute, University College Dublin Founded in 1663, the Royal Society has played a part in some of the most fundamental, significant, and life-changing discoveries in scientific history. It published Isaac Newton’s Principia Mathematica, and Benjamin Franklin’s kite experiment demonstrating the electrical nature of lightning. It also backed James Cook’s journey to Tahiti, reaching Australia and New Zealand, to track the Transit of Venus. The Royal Society's motto "Nullius in verba" is taken to mean "take nobody's word for it". It is an expression of the determination of Fellows to withstand the domination of authority and to verify all statements by an appeal to facts determined by experiment. The leading scientifi...

    published: 05 May 2017
  • Science Stories - Unexpected

    We need mathematical help to tell the difference between a real discovery and the illusion of one. Fellow of the Royal Society and future President of the Royal Statistical Society, Sir David Spiegelhalter visits Dr Nicole Janz to discuss reproducibility in scientific publications.

    published: 22 Dec 2015
  • New Web site of historic documents marks Royal Society's 350th anniversary

    (30 Nov 2009) SHOTLIST AP Television Royal Society, London, UK, 26 November 2009 1. Wide taxi as it drives past the Royal Society building 2. Close-up the Royal Society sign over the doorway 3. Wide looking up at ceiling from stairwell 4. Mid tilt down ceiling to list of Presidents of the Royal Society list on wall 5. Mid pan left painting on wall to statue in front of window 6. Close-up statue of Newton in front of window 7. SOUNDBITE (English): Lord Martin Rees, President, the Royal Society and Master of Trinity College at the University of Cambridge "We're one of the oldest academies in the world and mainly we look forward to the future because science is ever more part of our world and part of our concerns. But we are having the luxury of looking back on our past and r...

    published: 23 Jul 2015
  • Royal Fellow of the Royal Society

    A Royal Fellow of the Royal Society is a member of the British Royal Family who as been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.The council of the Royal Society recommends members of the Royal Family to be elected and then the existing Fellows vote by a secret ballot whether to accept them.The ballots have only a box to tick supporting the measure; those opposing have to write "no" or otherwise mark or spoil the paper.As of 2016 the Patron was Queen Elizabeth II, and Royal Fellows were: The British Monarch is always the Patron of the Royal Society, regardless of whether he/she has been previously elected a Royal Fellow. This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative...

    published: 13 Aug 2016
  • The Royal Society, Convocation of the Fellowship Part III

    published: 02 Jun 2016
  • Tercentenary Of The Royal Society AKA Queen At Tercentenary Of Royal Society (1960)

    Unissued / unused material - dates and locations may be unclear / unknown. London MS King Gustav and Queen Louise of Sweden alight from car and are greeted. MS People standing in rain, with raincoats on and umbrellas up. MS Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, arrive. Various interior shots as procession of Fellows makes its way down aisle. Various shots as the Queen and Duke make their way to platform. LS and MS Queen speaking, congratulating the Royal Society of London for improving Natural Knowledge, the oldest scientific Society in the world, on its Tercentenary and on the fine work it does for the cause of science, and concludes by presenting a silver bell to the President as a token of her continuing interest in the work of the Society. (Nat. sound). CUs Fe...

    published: 13 Apr 2014
  • Lewis Wolpert - Being elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (17/36)

    Born in South Africa in 1929, Lewis Wolpert is a developmental biologist, author and broadcaster. He proposed the French Flag model, explaining positional information in development. Made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1980, he received a CBE in 1990. [Listener: Eleanor Lawrence] TRANSCRIPT: The chick limb work went... went well... it’s controversial, it’s certainly even now today not solved. And, you know, I had excellent PhD students and we had a very happy... happy group at the Middlesex Hospital Medical School. And then, in 1973, Waddington put me up for the Royal Society, and that’s a great compliment to be put up as a... become a possible Fellow of the Royal Society and you’re put up in the first instance for seven years and each year some committee looks at you and decides whethe...

    published: 04 Oct 2017
  • Seeing Further: The Story of Science and the Royal Society

    As part of its 350th anniversary celebrations, the Royal Society has published 'Seeing Further', a new book of essays by a range of scientists, science writers and other authors about science and the Royal Society over the last 350 years.  Filmed at Online webcast on Thu 28 Jan 2010 6.30pm - 7.30pm For more information visit http://royalsociety.org/events/2010/seeing-further

    published: 10 Dec 2013
  • Aaron Klug - Fellowship of The Royal Society (96/120)

    Born in Lithuania in 1926, British chemist Aaron Klug won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1982 for developments in electron microscopy and his work on complexes of nucleic acids and proteins. His long and influential career led to a knighthood in 1988. [Listeners: Ken Holmes, John Finch] TRANSCRIPT: [JF] In 1995, you were elected the President of the Royal Society. Can you tell us how it worked? How it functioned? With relation to affecting Government policy or... Or being taken no notice of? Which is the other part of the story. Well, my involvement with the Royal Society goes back quite a while. I was elected a Fellow in 1969, and of course I sat on various committees, on national committees, and on the selection committees, as they're called. Sectional committees, I should say, whic...

    published: 04 Aug 2017
  • Founding the Royal Society

    http://www.cosmicpolymath.com/

    published: 20 Apr 2015
  • Discovering Astrobiology with Dr Zita Martins

    Royal Society University Research Fellow Dr Zita Martins answers questions about meteors, meteorites and the origins of life on earth.

    published: 17 Apr 2013
  • The Setting up of The Royal Society - Professor Michael Hunter

    Professor Michael Hunter discusses the cultural and scientific context surrounding the formation of The Royal Society. The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/early-science-an-historical-perspective-part-1 Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. http://www.gresham.ac.uk

    published: 22 Aug 2011
  • Royal Society Industry Fellowship case study - Dr James Curran

    Dr James Curran from Keronite International Ltd talks about the research he carries out with the University of Cambridge as part of his Royal Society Industry Fellowship. The Royal Society Industry Fellowship is for academic scientists who want to work on a collaborative project with industry and scientists in industry who want to work on a collaborative project with an academic organisation.

    published: 07 Dec 2012
  • Royal Society of Edinburgh - Enterprise Fellowship Scheme

    RSE Enterprise Fellowships enable innovators and researchers to become successful entrepreneurs. With support from the BBSRC, STFC and Scottish Enterprise, awardees receive one year's funding and training to help commercialise their ideas and launch their businesses.

    published: 26 Oct 2016
  • Women in Science: Royal Society Fellow Dr. Brenda Milner

    Dr. Milner discusses the challenges and opportunities faced by women embracing careers in science and shares her experiences. The interview was filmed following a roundtable on women in science at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

    published: 22 Feb 2013
  • Royal Society of Canada Class of 2017 Fellows: John Harriss

    Simon Fraser University international studies professor John Harriss, of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, is one of two faculty members to be named to the Royal Society of Canada's latest class of Fellows.

    published: 07 Sep 2017
  • Professor Joe Sweeney, Chair, Royal Society Industry Fellow College - University of Huddersfield

    Joe Sweeney is Professor of Catalysis and Chemical Biology at the University of Huddersfield and has recently been appointed as the Chair of the Royal Society Industry Fellow College. His fields of expertise covers chemical research in both catalyzed synthesis and chemical biology. Here he talks about how the Industry Fellow College can aid academics working with industry for mutual benefit. Joe Sweeney - http://www.hud.ac.uk/ourstaff/profile/index.php?staffuid=sappjbs

    published: 27 Feb 2013
  • Royal Society

    The President, Council, and Fellows of the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society for science and is possibly the oldest such society still in existence.Founded in November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society".The Society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences and fulfills a number of roles; promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global cooperation, education and public engagement.The society is governed by its Council, which is chaired by the Society's President, according to a set of statutes and standing ord...

    published: 16 Sep 2016
  • Wonders of Chemistry talk | The Royal Society

    An introduction to the "Wonders of Chemistry" talk at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition 2012, by Royal Society University Research Fellow Dr Steve Liddle and David Mills from the University of Nottingham.

    published: 04 Jul 2012
  • ICR CEO Professor Paul Workman elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society

    Professor Paul Workman, CEO of The Institute of Cancer Research, London, responds to the announcement that he will be elected to the Royal Society alongside his ICR colleague Professor Jon Pines. In this video, Professor Workman explains the nature of his research, thanks colleagues and family, and describes his vision for the future of cancer research at the institute. Read the full story: http://www.icr.ac.uk/news-archive/eminent-cancer-researchers-elected-to-royal-society-fellowship

    published: 29 Apr 2016
  • Royal Society of Canada Class of 2017 Fellows: Nick Blomley

    Simon Fraser University geography professor Nick Blomley, of the Faculty of Environment, is one of two faculty members to be named to the Royal Society of Canada's latest class of Fellows.

    published: 07 Sep 2017
  • What is the RSA?

    What on earth is the RSA, and what does it do? Everyone’s favourite hairy hand (and proud RSA Fellow!) Andrew Park explains all with his trusty black pen. Narrated by George the Poet (another Fellow!) Want to support our work and become a Fellow yourself? https://www.thersa.org/fellowship/what-is-fellowship/ Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEvents Like the RSA on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theRSAorg Listen to RSA podcasts: https://www.mixcloud.com/RSA/ See RSA Events behind the scenes: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/

    published: 03 Nov 2015
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The Royal Society, Convocation of the Fellowship Part I

The Royal Society, Convocation of the Fellowship Part I

  • Order:
  • Duration: 22:54
  • Updated: 02 Jun 2016
  • views: 186
videos
https://wn.com/The_Royal_Society,_Convocation_Of_The_Fellowship_Part_I
Professor Jonathon Pines elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society

Professor Jonathon Pines elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:04
  • Updated: 29 Apr 2016
  • views: 641
videos
Professor Jonathon Pines, head of the division of Cancer Biology at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, has been elected as a Fellow of the prestigious Royal Society. Here, he explains why his election is such an honour for a UK scientist, details his area of research and describes the opportunities at the ICR for furthering cancer research. Read the full story: http://www.icr.ac.uk/news-archive/eminent-cancer-researchers-elected-to-royal-society-fellowship
https://wn.com/Professor_Jonathon_Pines_Elected_As_A_Fellow_Of_The_Royal_Society
UCD Professor Kenneth Wolfe elected Fellow of the Royal Society

UCD Professor Kenneth Wolfe elected Fellow of the Royal Society

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:31
  • Updated: 05 May 2017
  • views: 500
videos
Professor of Genomic Evolution, UCD School of Medicine and UCD Conway Institute, University College Dublin Founded in 1663, the Royal Society has played a part in some of the most fundamental, significant, and life-changing discoveries in scientific history. It published Isaac Newton’s Principia Mathematica, and Benjamin Franklin’s kite experiment demonstrating the electrical nature of lightning. It also backed James Cook’s journey to Tahiti, reaching Australia and New Zealand, to track the Transit of Venus. The Royal Society's motto "Nullius in verba" is taken to mean "take nobody's word for it". It is an expression of the determination of Fellows to withstand the domination of authority and to verify all statements by an appeal to facts determined by experiment. The leading scientific lights of the past four centuries can be found among the 8,000 plus Fellows elected to the Society to date. From Newton to Darwin to Einstein and beyond, pioneers and paragons in their fields are elected by their peers. Current Fellows include Jocelyn Bell Burnell, Richard Dawkins, Stephen Hawking and Tim Berners-Lee. UCD Twitter: http://twitter.com/ucddublin UCD Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/universitycollegedublin UCD Instagram: http://instagram.com/ucddublin UCD Homepage: http://www.ucd.ie
https://wn.com/Ucd_Professor_Kenneth_Wolfe_Elected_Fellow_Of_The_Royal_Society
Science Stories - Unexpected

Science Stories - Unexpected

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:19
  • Updated: 22 Dec 2015
  • views: 5353
videos
We need mathematical help to tell the difference between a real discovery and the illusion of one. Fellow of the Royal Society and future President of the Royal Statistical Society, Sir David Spiegelhalter visits Dr Nicole Janz to discuss reproducibility in scientific publications.
https://wn.com/Science_Stories_Unexpected
New Web site of historic documents marks Royal Society's 350th anniversary

New Web site of historic documents marks Royal Society's 350th anniversary

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:46
  • Updated: 23 Jul 2015
  • views: 5534
videos
(30 Nov 2009) SHOTLIST AP Television Royal Society, London, UK, 26 November 2009 1. Wide taxi as it drives past the Royal Society building 2. Close-up the Royal Society sign over the doorway 3. Wide looking up at ceiling from stairwell 4. Mid tilt down ceiling to list of Presidents of the Royal Society list on wall 5. Mid pan left painting on wall to statue in front of window 6. Close-up statue of Newton in front of window 7. SOUNDBITE (English): Lord Martin Rees, President, the Royal Society and Master of Trinity College at the University of Cambridge "We're one of the oldest academies in the world and mainly we look forward to the future because science is ever more part of our world and part of our concerns. But we are having the luxury of looking back on our past and recording some of the highlights of the work of our fellows right back to the foundation in 1660." 8. Mid close-up of busts in front of doorway 9. SOUNDBITE (English): Lord Martin Rees, President, the Royal Society and Master of Trinity College at the University of Cambridge "Science is not just for scientists, it's part of everyone's culture and also everyone needs to be involved in deciding how science should be applied, because there are all kinds of priority questions and ethical questions, and scientists themselves have no particular expertise on those, but they should engage with a very wide public and that's what we try to do in the Royal Society." 10. Wide pan right people talking, documents are placed on two tables on the left and right hand sides of the room 11. Close-up pan right documents and bust placed on the table 12. Mid portrait of Sir Isaac Newton on wall 13. Close-up of portrait of Sir Isaac Newton 14. Close-up Sir Isaac Newton document, 'Theory on light and colours (1672)' 15. SOUNDBITE (English): Keith Moore, Librarian and Curator, the Royal Society "Here we have Newton's drawing of his first reflecting telescope and this is very important for the fellows because it allowed them to improve their observation of the heavens." 16. Close-up and zoom in hand turning page of Sir Isaac Newton's document, 'Theory on light and colours (1672)' 17. SOUNDBITE (English): Keith Moore, Librarian and Curator, the Royal Society "This is where Newton takes a prism and splits white light into its constituent colours, so this is really a piece of fundamental, experimental science." 18. Close-up hand pointing to prism in Sir Isaac Newton document 19. SOUNDBITE (English): Keith Moore, Librarian and Curator, the Royal Society "Here is Benjamin Franklin's account of the Philadelphia experiment written from Philadelphia in 1752. He says in it that he's noticed the European newspapers carrying accounts of this, and he writes the Royal Society to give a true account of the experiment. He begins by telling Fellows how to construct a kite made of silk, because of course a paper kite would fall apart in a thunder storm, and then the experiment is conducted, culminating in Franklin holding his knuckle close to the key tied to the kite and the hairs on the back of his knuckle standing up, and then he realises that lightning is of an electrical nature." 19. Close-up hand turning page of Benjamin Franklin's document, 'Flying a kite in an electrical storm (1752)' SOUNDBITE (English): Keith Moore, Librarian and Curator, the Royal Society "Here we have another famous Fellow of the Royal Society, Captain James Cook, who of course explored Australia on his first voyage in the endeavour. Here he is, returning home from the Resolution voyage, one of the Resolution voyages, and detailing how he kept his crew healthy by using sauerkraut in order to prevent scurvy amongst his naval crew." 20. Mid zoom in portrait of Robert Boyle on wall You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/4cf9be52033e35d130a67665db358eb1 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/New_Web_Site_Of_Historic_Documents_Marks_Royal_Society's_350Th_Anniversary
Royal Fellow of the Royal Society

Royal Fellow of the Royal Society

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:41
  • Updated: 13 Aug 2016
  • views: 48
videos
A Royal Fellow of the Royal Society is a member of the British Royal Family who as been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.The council of the Royal Society recommends members of the Royal Family to be elected and then the existing Fellows vote by a secret ballot whether to accept them.The ballots have only a box to tick supporting the measure; those opposing have to write "no" or otherwise mark or spoil the paper.As of 2016 the Patron was Queen Elizabeth II, and Royal Fellows were: The British Monarch is always the Patron of the Royal Society, regardless of whether he/she has been previously elected a Royal Fellow. This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative Commons license Image source in video
https://wn.com/Royal_Fellow_Of_The_Royal_Society
The Royal Society, Convocation of the Fellowship Part III

The Royal Society, Convocation of the Fellowship Part III

  • Order:
  • Duration: 21:31
  • Updated: 02 Jun 2016
  • views: 54
videos
https://wn.com/The_Royal_Society,_Convocation_Of_The_Fellowship_Part_Iii
Tercentenary Of The Royal Society AKA Queen At Tercentenary Of Royal Society (1960)

Tercentenary Of The Royal Society AKA Queen At Tercentenary Of Royal Society (1960)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:10
  • Updated: 13 Apr 2014
  • views: 98
videos
Unissued / unused material - dates and locations may be unclear / unknown. London MS King Gustav and Queen Louise of Sweden alight from car and are greeted. MS People standing in rain, with raincoats on and umbrellas up. MS Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, arrive. Various interior shots as procession of Fellows makes its way down aisle. Various shots as the Queen and Duke make their way to platform. LS and MS Queen speaking, congratulating the Royal Society of London for improving Natural Knowledge, the oldest scientific Society in the world, on its Tercentenary and on the fine work it does for the cause of science, and concludes by presenting a silver bell to the President as a token of her continuing interest in the work of the Society. (Nat. sound). CUs Fellows of Royal Society applauding. LS President of Royal Society makes his speech of thanks. (Nat. sound). LS King of Sweden is formally admitted into the Society. (Nat. sound). MS King signs the Charter Book. LS King of Sweden makes speech of thanks for the Royal Society making him an Honorary Fellow. (Nat. sound). Various shots as the Queen, Prince Philip, King and Queen of Sweden leave the hall. LS Royal Standard flying from roof of Albert Hall. Note: "Date received" on original paperwork reads: 19/07/1960. FILM ID:2970.25 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/
https://wn.com/Tercentenary_Of_The_Royal_Society_Aka_Queen_At_Tercentenary_Of_Royal_Society_(1960)
Lewis Wolpert - Being elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (17/36)

Lewis Wolpert - Being elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (17/36)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:46
  • Updated: 04 Oct 2017
  • views: 1
videos
Born in South Africa in 1929, Lewis Wolpert is a developmental biologist, author and broadcaster. He proposed the French Flag model, explaining positional information in development. Made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1980, he received a CBE in 1990. [Listener: Eleanor Lawrence] TRANSCRIPT: The chick limb work went... went well... it’s controversial, it’s certainly even now today not solved. And, you know, I had excellent PhD students and we had a very happy... happy group at the Middlesex Hospital Medical School. And then, in 1973, Waddington put me up for the Royal Society, and that’s a great compliment to be put up as a... become a possible Fellow of the Royal Society and you’re put up in the first instance for seven years and each year some committee looks at you and decides whether to accept you. And after six years I hadn’t been accepted and Waddington had died in the meantime and other people were... were involved, and then I must say, to my enormous pleasure, I became elected a Fellow in 1980 and in fact it was Peter Medawar, who phoned my secretary — Maureen Maloney — who I work with very closely, to say that I had, in fact, been elected. I can’t tell you how important it is to be elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. And when you become elected and you sit on the committees which try and decide who will be elected, you cannot get over the idea that you have been elected, because it’s so competitive, so... there are so many candidates and there are so few who actually become elected, there’re only 40 or so P... scientists a year, that get elected, but it is an enormous honour and it makes a very, very big difference and I was very, very grateful that I did in fact, become elected and I was on various committees of the Royal Society and that... that has been really quite important to me. And, of course, at this time, while I was doing all this science, I became involved in a different issue altogether and that is the actual relationship between science and the public, because what struck me, is how little science my non-scientific friends understood. And I gave a set of lectures — I don’t know why they invited me — in Warwick and on the base of those lectures I wrote a book called 'the'Unnatural Nature of Science', which I’m still very fond of that book, pointing out that any common sense view, that anyone has about the nature of the world, it will be scientifically false. It... Is it not against all common sense, that when you’re going at 400 miles an hour in an aeroplane, there is no force acting on you? Force does not cause motion, it causes acceleration. That’s as Newton pointed out, but it’s so counterintuitive as to be absolutely bizarre, and when it comes to complicated things like cells or molecules or quantum mechanics, things become absolutely impossible; science really is unnatural. And I think it’s very important that people really realise that science doesn’t fit easily with common sense. I know it’s been argued, and I... argued, that science is organised common sense, but it’s very highly organised common sense. And I really... that was the second book. I’d also written a book... 'The Triumph of the Embryo'. I was married to Jill Neville, a writer at the time, and she persuaded me to give it that title and it was for the general public that I wrote this book about how embryos develop. It was too complicated, they didn’t... the general public didn’t really... didn’t really understand it and I also, in those days, was doing interviews on the radio and I interviewed many, many major scientists... oh, Francis Crick, Sydney Brenner, all sorts of people and we published these — Oxford University Press — I’m delighted to say, published this. I did these interviews with Alison Richards, we travelled around the world and they were published in two volumes called 'A Passion for Science' and 'Passionate Minds' and I want to say, I think they’re a... a very nice... nice set of interviews. And then, about 15 years ago, I got a very severe depression. I still don’t understand why I became depressed. I was happily married, I was a professor at the university, I was 65 years old, everything was fine. I was having a minor heart problem, but I went into a very severe depression and was even hospitalised at the Royal Free for three weeks, because I was suicidal. I knew nothing about depression and I eventually recovered, I was put on antidepressants and I had... I also had cognitive therapy. And I eventually got better. I was living in this very flat where we’re sit... sitting now, and when I was ill, I discovered that my wife at that time — Jill Neville — never told anyone that I was depressed, she said the stigma will be too bad. And I thought, that’s bloody ridiculous... read the rest of the transcript at (https://www.webofstories.com/play/lewis.wolpert/17)
https://wn.com/Lewis_Wolpert_Being_Elected_A_Fellow_Of_The_Royal_Society_(17_36)
Seeing Further: The Story of Science and the Royal Society

Seeing Further: The Story of Science and the Royal Society

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:11:18
  • Updated: 10 Dec 2013
  • views: 1971
videos
As part of its 350th anniversary celebrations, the Royal Society has published 'Seeing Further', a new book of essays by a range of scientists, science writers and other authors about science and the Royal Society over the last 350 years.  Filmed at Online webcast on Thu 28 Jan 2010 6.30pm - 7.30pm For more information visit http://royalsociety.org/events/2010/seeing-further
https://wn.com/Seeing_Further_The_Story_Of_Science_And_The_Royal_Society
Aaron Klug - Fellowship of The Royal Society (96/120)

Aaron Klug - Fellowship of The Royal Society (96/120)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:52
  • Updated: 04 Aug 2017
  • views: 5
videos
Born in Lithuania in 1926, British chemist Aaron Klug won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1982 for developments in electron microscopy and his work on complexes of nucleic acids and proteins. His long and influential career led to a knighthood in 1988. [Listeners: Ken Holmes, John Finch] TRANSCRIPT: [JF] In 1995, you were elected the President of the Royal Society. Can you tell us how it worked? How it functioned? With relation to affecting Government policy or... Or being taken no notice of? Which is the other part of the story. Well, my involvement with the Royal Society goes back quite a while. I was elected a Fellow in 1969, and of course I sat on various committees, on national committees, and on the selection committees, as they're called. Sectional committees, I should say, which are basically selection committees in different subjects. But in 1989 I was elected to Council. The Royal Society consists of the President and what are called Officers, the Biological Secretary, the Physical Secretary, the Foreign Secretary, and the Treasurer. These are the five Officers, and I was just elected an ordinary member of Council, of which there are 21, and you serve for either two years or one year, that's in the original Statutes of Charles II, so there have to be 21 at any one time. I was elected, and the way George Porter, who was then the President, decided who would stay on for the second year was simply to add up the number of meetings you had attended. If you... those who attended fewer meetings were thrown off Council and some people were glad to do it. The reason I say is '89 because in '89 the... but the Council makes the decisions and prepares... I found the work quite interesting but the major thing we were doing in 1989/1990 was... global warming.
https://wn.com/Aaron_Klug_Fellowship_Of_The_Royal_Society_(96_120)
Founding the Royal Society

Founding the Royal Society

  • Order:
  • Duration: 24:23
  • Updated: 20 Apr 2015
  • views: 281
videos
http://www.cosmicpolymath.com/
https://wn.com/Founding_The_Royal_Society
Discovering Astrobiology with Dr Zita Martins

Discovering Astrobiology with Dr Zita Martins

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:05
  • Updated: 17 Apr 2013
  • views: 5334
videos
Royal Society University Research Fellow Dr Zita Martins answers questions about meteors, meteorites and the origins of life on earth.
https://wn.com/Discovering_Astrobiology_With_Dr_Zita_Martins
The Setting up of The Royal Society - Professor Michael Hunter

The Setting up of The Royal Society - Professor Michael Hunter

  • Order:
  • Duration: 25:41
  • Updated: 22 Aug 2011
  • views: 3777
videos
Professor Michael Hunter discusses the cultural and scientific context surrounding the formation of The Royal Society. The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/early-science-an-historical-perspective-part-1 Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. http://www.gresham.ac.uk
https://wn.com/The_Setting_Up_Of_The_Royal_Society_Professor_Michael_Hunter
Royal Society Industry Fellowship case study - Dr James Curran

Royal Society Industry Fellowship case study - Dr James Curran

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:24
  • Updated: 07 Dec 2012
  • views: 954
videos
Dr James Curran from Keronite International Ltd talks about the research he carries out with the University of Cambridge as part of his Royal Society Industry Fellowship. The Royal Society Industry Fellowship is for academic scientists who want to work on a collaborative project with industry and scientists in industry who want to work on a collaborative project with an academic organisation.
https://wn.com/Royal_Society_Industry_Fellowship_Case_Study_Dr_James_Curran
Royal Society of Edinburgh - Enterprise Fellowship Scheme

Royal Society of Edinburgh - Enterprise Fellowship Scheme

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:14
  • Updated: 26 Oct 2016
  • views: 49
videos
RSE Enterprise Fellowships enable innovators and researchers to become successful entrepreneurs. With support from the BBSRC, STFC and Scottish Enterprise, awardees receive one year's funding and training to help commercialise their ideas and launch their businesses.
https://wn.com/Royal_Society_Of_Edinburgh_Enterprise_Fellowship_Scheme
Women in Science: Royal Society Fellow Dr. Brenda Milner

Women in Science: Royal Society Fellow Dr. Brenda Milner

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:53
  • Updated: 22 Feb 2013
  • views: 680
videos
Dr. Milner discusses the challenges and opportunities faced by women embracing careers in science and shares her experiences. The interview was filmed following a roundtable on women in science at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.
https://wn.com/Women_In_Science_Royal_Society_Fellow_Dr._Brenda_Milner
Royal Society of Canada Class of 2017 Fellows: John Harriss

Royal Society of Canada Class of 2017 Fellows: John Harriss

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  • Duration: 1:07
  • Updated: 07 Sep 2017
  • views: 68
videos
Simon Fraser University international studies professor John Harriss, of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, is one of two faculty members to be named to the Royal Society of Canada's latest class of Fellows.
https://wn.com/Royal_Society_Of_Canada_Class_Of_2017_Fellows_John_Harriss
Professor Joe Sweeney, Chair, Royal Society Industry Fellow College - University of Huddersfield

Professor Joe Sweeney, Chair, Royal Society Industry Fellow College - University of Huddersfield

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  • Duration: 1:52
  • Updated: 27 Feb 2013
  • views: 570
videos
Joe Sweeney is Professor of Catalysis and Chemical Biology at the University of Huddersfield and has recently been appointed as the Chair of the Royal Society Industry Fellow College. His fields of expertise covers chemical research in both catalyzed synthesis and chemical biology. Here he talks about how the Industry Fellow College can aid academics working with industry for mutual benefit. Joe Sweeney - http://www.hud.ac.uk/ourstaff/profile/index.php?staffuid=sappjbs
https://wn.com/Professor_Joe_Sweeney,_Chair,_Royal_Society_Industry_Fellow_College_University_Of_Huddersfield
Royal Society

Royal Society

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  • Duration: 26:31
  • Updated: 16 Sep 2016
  • views: 142
videos
The President, Council, and Fellows of the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society for science and is possibly the oldest such society still in existence.Founded in November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society".The Society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences and fulfills a number of roles; promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global cooperation, education and public engagement.The society is governed by its Council, which is chaired by the Society's President, according to a set of statutes and standing orders. ---Image-Copyright-and-Permission--- About the author(s): Sir Godfrey Kneller (1646–1723) Alternative names Gottfried Kneller, Birth name: Gottfried Kniller Description German painter, draughtsman, engraver and miniaturist Date of birth/death 8 August 1646 7 November 1723 Location of birth/death Lübeck London Work period between circa 1660 and circa 1723 Work location Leiden (circa 1660–1665), Rome, Venice (1672–1675), Nuremberg, Hamburg (1674–1676), London (1676–1723), France (1684–1685) Authority control VIAF: 74127041 ISNI: 0000 0000 8154 5352 ULAN: 500015875 LCCN: n82103048 NLA: 35216965 WorldCat License: Public domain Author(s): Sir Godfrey Kneller (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Godfrey_Kneller) ---Image-Copyright-and-Permission--- This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative Commons license Image source in video
https://wn.com/Royal_Society
Wonders of Chemistry talk | The Royal Society

Wonders of Chemistry talk | The Royal Society

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  • Duration: 1:32
  • Updated: 04 Jul 2012
  • views: 181
videos
An introduction to the "Wonders of Chemistry" talk at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition 2012, by Royal Society University Research Fellow Dr Steve Liddle and David Mills from the University of Nottingham.
https://wn.com/Wonders_Of_Chemistry_Talk_|_The_Royal_Society
ICR CEO Professor Paul Workman elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society

ICR CEO Professor Paul Workman elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society

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  • Duration: 2:06
  • Updated: 29 Apr 2016
  • views: 309
videos
Professor Paul Workman, CEO of The Institute of Cancer Research, London, responds to the announcement that he will be elected to the Royal Society alongside his ICR colleague Professor Jon Pines. In this video, Professor Workman explains the nature of his research, thanks colleagues and family, and describes his vision for the future of cancer research at the institute. Read the full story: http://www.icr.ac.uk/news-archive/eminent-cancer-researchers-elected-to-royal-society-fellowship
https://wn.com/Icr_Ceo_Professor_Paul_Workman_Elected_As_A_Fellow_Of_The_Royal_Society
Royal Society of Canada Class of 2017 Fellows: Nick Blomley

Royal Society of Canada Class of 2017 Fellows: Nick Blomley

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  • Duration: 1:09
  • Updated: 07 Sep 2017
  • views: 93
videos
Simon Fraser University geography professor Nick Blomley, of the Faculty of Environment, is one of two faculty members to be named to the Royal Society of Canada's latest class of Fellows.
https://wn.com/Royal_Society_Of_Canada_Class_Of_2017_Fellows_Nick_Blomley
What is the RSA?

What is the RSA?

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  • Duration: 2:35
  • Updated: 03 Nov 2015
  • views: 120901
videos
What on earth is the RSA, and what does it do? Everyone’s favourite hairy hand (and proud RSA Fellow!) Andrew Park explains all with his trusty black pen. Narrated by George the Poet (another Fellow!) Want to support our work and become a Fellow yourself? https://www.thersa.org/fellowship/what-is-fellowship/ Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEvents Like the RSA on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theRSAorg Listen to RSA podcasts: https://www.mixcloud.com/RSA/ See RSA Events behind the scenes: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/
https://wn.com/What_Is_The_Rsa